Monday, July 1, 2024

Kamenice Beach Cave

Kamenice beach is an out-of-the-way for most people visiting the Komiza village. Komiza is a picturesque fishing village on the island of Vis in the Adriatic Sea archipelago in Croatia.

There's also a small cave, if you go from the next beach to the north (the Dog Beach) towards Kamenice beach, there's a big hole in the cliff that you can go through. I was unable (due to high water and waves) go through to the next cliff, but based on pictures taken from the Kamenice beach direction there's possibly a bigger cave in the next cliff, and you may be able to get to this by going through the hole mentioned above.

If you come from the other direction, from Kamenice Beach to Dog Beach, you have to go around a cliff which you should be able to do, but again waves and high water prevented me from doing it. There's a small sandy spot between this cliff and the one that's supposedly holding the bigger cave.

See a picture of the bigger cave on the very left side of the below photo:

The smaller cave from the Dog Beach side is at N 43.0390013 E 16.0914765.

The whole area is volcanic. Actually, a plug of volcanic material blocks flow of water from the hills higher up on Vis island, creating a water barrier where the few holes form springs with fresh water. This was one of the reasons why Komiza formed here: availability of fresh water. At the Kamenica Beach there's an ancient fountain that leverages these springs:

Komiza is part of the Geopark Vis Archipelago, covering the island of Vis and surrounding places (such as the Biševo island and its blue cave). See the home page of the geopark here.

The description of the Kamenice Beach can be found here. The beach is at N 43.038200 E 16.092050. The Dog Beach is described here. This beach is at N 43.039195 E 16.091489.

First, a mandatory sunset picture:


The small cave hole entrance:


Overview of the Kamenize beach:


More sunsets:


Read more urban exploration stories from theurbanexplorer.net, and other underground stories from planetcaver.net. Read the full Planetskier series at planetskier.net, or all blog articles from Blogspot or TGR. Photos and text (c) 2023 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved. 


Radisson Blu Split Spa

Radisson Blu in Split has a nice spa area.

I couldn't take photos inside as it was not empty, but they have a 20-meter pool and several saunas. There's also massage and other wellness services available.

The website is here. They are located at N 43.503135 E 16.470007.


Derelict buildings nearby:


Beautiful sunset:

For more sauna and swimming stories, check out planetswimmer.com and saunablogger.cool websites! And of course the Planetcaver, and Planetskier blogs for other stories in Blogspot and TGR! The photos and text (c) 2023 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved. I never take recognisable photos of other saunagoers or swimmers. and try to visit at times where there is simply no one else around or the facility has been booked only for me.

Sunday, June 30, 2024

Ruma Borkovac

Hotel Borkovac is a nice, small spa hotel with a pool, saunas, etc.

I enjoyed the snow shower the most, though.

The views were also great from their patio, from the nicely shaped lounging pods.

The hotel's website is here. It is located in Ruma, Serbia at coordinates N 45.034027 E 19.819256. Ruma in Finnish means "ugly" but it is not that all, the environment is quite nice.



For more sauna and swimming stories, check out planetswimmer.com and saunablogger.cool websites! And of course the Planetcaver, and Planetskier blogs for other stories in Blogspot and TGR! The photos and text (c) 2023 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved. I never take recognisable photos of other saunagoers or swimmers. and try to visit at times where there is simply no one else around or the facility has been booked only for me.

Saturday, June 29, 2024

Grotte di Rescia

Grotte di Rescia has been a show cave already from year 1700... it is a small (500 meters long) cave in Rescia, Lombardy, close to the shores of Lago di Lugano in Italy. It has been formed from tuff deposits dragged for centuries by calcareous spring waters. It is a nicely lit show cave, and the walk to the cave involves beautiful green mountain scenery with waterfalls, etc. Much recommended!

Coordinates to the cave are N 46.014122 E 9.106443. More information from the official website or Wikipedia.

Photos:









Read more urban exploration stories from theurbanexplorer.net, and other underground stories from planetcaver.net. Read the full Planetskier series at planetskier.net, or all blog articles from Blogspot or TGR. Photos and text (c) 2015 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved. 

Friday, June 28, 2024

Orrido di Bellano

Orrido Bellano is a deep canyon or a gorge, formed through water sculpting the rock. There are beautiful rock formations and caves within the gorge. It can be accessed by paying a fee to walk the walkways attached to the walls of the gorge.

However, to access the gorge the facility must be open ... which we realized with my son when we visited it during some kind of holiday when it was not open, despite claims on the web site to the contrary. Or was open too late for us to wait and still make it on our flights back home. Oh well. I had actually visited the places some years earlier on another trip.

The gorge entrance is located here: N 46.042642 E 9.304930. More information can be found here and here.

More photos:







Read more urban exploration stories from theurbanexplorer.net, and other underground stories from planetcaver.net. Read the full Planetskier series at planetskier.net, or all blog articles from Blogspot or TGR. Photos and text (c) 2015-2024 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved. 


Sunday, June 16, 2024

Bosnian Pyramid of the Sun

I visited the Bosnian Pyramid of the Sun, as well as the Ravne tunnels few kilometers away. The pyramid is remarkably pyramid-looking green mountain and the tunnels are .. well, more about that later. Both are in the small town of Visoko, 35 kilometers outside Sarajevo.  The claim is that the pyramid is a concrete-covered man-made structure built by an ancient civilization 29 000 years ago. And that the tunnels were also man-made network leading under the pyramids, and only later filled in. And that there are health benefits to all of this. Long story short: lots of pseudoscience, but of course a nice mountain to visit. And it is always pleasant to be wet, dark underground tunnels. Even if the the support beams are rotting...

Here's a view of the "concrete cover" in the pyramid:

The "cover" is only visible in a few places, however, as the mountain is generally entirely covered by grass and trees. To my untrained eye it wasn't clear to my the "concrete" would be actually concrete -- some of it looks like regular stone, some looks like conglomerate rock found in many places.

A view of the pyramid from further away is shown below. The photo is taken from the town center if Visoko, at the very nice hotel Vema where you can ask for "pyramid view" rooms :-)

The main clue to all these claims being pseudoscience was when the tour guide said that it was shown water crystals are damaged by listening to heavy metal music. Clearly, heavy metal can only be good for everything, including water crystals :-)

For more information, look at the Wikipedia page for a critical evaluation of the claims about the pyramid. The organization pushing for the claims is Bosnian Pyramid of the Sun Foundation (home page).

They sell all kinds of interesting gadgets and materials in their shop at the Ravne site. An ionisator for 100€, a book in which their lead researcher, Semir Osmanagić, chats about the pyramid with ChatGPT, and so on:

But let's look at the claims more carefully:

Claim 1:

The pyramid is a man-made structure.

Evidence: Quoting Wikipedia's summary [1]: Direct study of the site by geologists, archaeologists, and other scientists has demonstrated that the hills are natural formations known as flatirons,[ and that there is no evidence that they were shaped by human construction. And quoting Stephan Coric from Bohannon's article in Science (2006): "The stone slabs are nothing more than fractured chunks of sediment called breccia" [2].

Claim 2:

The Ravne tunnels are man-made. 

Evidence: one of the basis of the claims that they are man-made rests on finding "dry wall" stone structures in the tunnels. These are rocks laid on top of each other by humans, with little sand or other material in between. Here's a photo, as well as a book excerpt from Osmanagić:

However, this is far from convincing. Any openings (man-made or natural) under ground are prone to water flows, and rivers can wash rocks clean by transporting small material away. Later new floods may bring new material and, e.g., cover layers of rock by mud or silt as shown in the book picture. We see these in natural caves all the time. Or, perhaps these layers of dirt and rock were on the surface at the time rocks moved around with the force of water. 

And it is undisputed that the foundation dug out the tunnels. They took material out, and built the wooden supports to hold the the rest of the material above the tunnels up. Did they just dug in plain natural hill, perhaps leveraging some naturally occurring channels of differing materials inside? 

Or, quoting Anthony Harding speaking in [2], "If these were made by humans without establishing their age, I would just assume they are part of an old mine". And Harding's verdict was "Its just a hill".

Claim 3:

Evidence:

Schumann Resonance is real phenomenon. The question though is if it has a health impact. A Japanese research team concluded that "neither subjective health nor depression was significantly associated with BPR-SR (blood pressure reactivity to Schumann Resonance)" [3]

Claim 4:

This is based on Masaru Emoto's work on "water crystals" and the possibility that water would carry information. 

Evidence: Biochemist and Director of Microscopy at University College Cork William Reville wrote, "It is very unlikely that there is any reality behind Emoto's claims." [4,5]

Claim 5:

I was unable to find research articles, but the problems with this claimed scale are many, starting from that no one has published a definition or method for measuring it. As the Wikipedia article [6] puts it: "These are pseudoscientific concepts devoid of any experimental evidence.".


Conclusion

So no, there's no linkage with any of this to real things.

However, speaking personally, I still like to calm down and mediate in dark, wet underground places. There's something about the silence and darkness that soothes me :-)

So the tunnels *are* good for mediation:

Do pay attention though, I'm not entirely sure the tunnels are in great shape. They are excavated tunnels in a loose or conglomerate rock and sand. Cave-in is a real possibility, particularly when the support beams look like this:


References

[1] "Bosnian pyramid claims"- Wikipedia.

[2] Bohannon, John (22 September 2006). "Mad About Pyramids". Science. 313 (5794). AAAS: 1718–1720. doi:10.1126/science.313.5794.1718. PMID 16990525. S2CID 161209455.

[2] Mitsutake G, Otsuka K, Hayakawa M, Sekiguchi M, Cornélissen G, Halberg F. Does Schumann resonance affect our blood pressure? Biomed Pharmacother. 2005 Oct;59 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):S10-4. doi: 10.1016/s0753-3322(05)80003-4. PMID: 16275477; PMCID: PMC2656447.

[3] "Masaru Emoto". Wikipedia.

[4] Reville, William (February 17, 2011). "The pseudoscience of creating beautiful (or ugly) water". The Irish Times. Dublin. p. 14. ProQuest 851900025.

[5] "Scala Bovis". Wikipedia.


More photos from the tunnels






Read more urban exploration stories from theurbanexplorer.net, and other underground stories from planetcaver.net. Read the full Planetskier series at planetskier.net, or all blog articles from Blogspot or TGR. Photos and text (c) 2024 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved.