Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Sauna at the duck

 

Tero and I stayed at the "Duck" (Ankka), a cabin near Ruka. We had driven up with Tero's car to avoid having to use flights or get too exposed to viruses.

A primary criteria for me in choosing hotels and cabins is of course that there's a sauna!

The Duck was not new, but a reasonable and nice place to stay at. There was also a small sauna.

The cabin:




Reindeer on the road:

For more sauna and swimming stories, check out planetswimmer.com and saunablogger.cool websites! And of course the Planetcaver, and Planetskier blogs for other stories in Blogspot and TGR! The photos and text (c) 2020 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved.

Sunday, November 29, 2020

White wall


I recently watched the new mini-series "White Wall" on YLE Areena. This is a Finnish-Swedish production. The plot is about a mine being converted to store nuclear waste... until they hit something strange.

Much recommended, I really enjoyed the series. It is freely accessible from YLE Areena (in Finland).

The series have been shot at the Finnish Pyhäsalmi mine, Europe's deepest metal mine. There's also the world's deepest-located sauna in this mine (something I'd *love* visit some day). 

See reviews and more information about the series from Wikipedia and IMDB.

See more caving stories at Planetcaver.net, and all Planetskier and Planetcaver stories at Blogspot and TGR! See also my cave map that runs the Psgeo software that has now been open sourced! This article (c) 2020 by JJari Arkko. All rights reserved. The TV series image is from YLE.

Grottan 3


The third issue of this year's Grottan -- Swedish Caver's Association's magazine -- came in mail today.

The main attraction in this issue is Finland's cave historian Ralf Strandell's massive 16-page article on the history of Finnish caving from the 1400s. And that's only "Part I"! It is remarkable how Ralf has managed to find material about cave exploration in old times -- where Finland's rural society did not give much room for research and exploration, and written records were scant. Particularly when the Finnish caves are all quite small. Yet the earliest evidence of caves date back to the early years of the 1400s, coins from that era found from archeological digs, farm or place names referring to caves in maps, etc.

Ralf's article has previously also appeared the Finnish Caver's Association's magazine. If you haven't read Ralf's article, you can get a copy by ordering one from either the Swedish or Finnish association. The Finnish one can be ordered from here: Luola.

Interestingly, the Swedish association is now making all their magazines available online, as all issues from the beginning of time have scanned. I'd love to have this also for the Finnish magazine! Unfortunately, the Swedish site is currently undergoing maintenance, and the member login which would be required for the access isn't working right now.

The other interesting article in this Grottan is about John Mylroie's work on how caves in space might impact what we think of as caves. Ulla Petterson has looked at John's work. To begin with, clearly caves out there are not "subterranean". But what really counts as a cave, would'd earths's molten core count as a cave, it is a liquid-filled cavity after all? :-) And do humans need to be able to access a void in order for us to call it a cave, which would preclude lava bubbles inside rock from being classified as caves? Some definitions of cave discuss of voids filled with air or water, but would vacuum-filled moon caves count? How long does a cave have to last or how big does it need to be in order to count as a cave, does a bullet fired into water create a short-lived cave behind its path?

You can access John's original article from the caves.org page.

See more caving stories at Planetcaver.net, and all Planetskier and Planetcaver stories at Blogspot and TGR! See also my cave map that runs the Psgeo software that has now been open sourced! This article and photos are (c) 2020 by Jari Arkko, with the original magazines and books pictured being copyright of the respective publications, of course. All rights reserved.

Monday, November 23, 2020

Strange rock

 

Tero and I were on a trip... while caving was not the main purpose of the trip, as usual I also wanted visit a cave. A promising-looking hole at the Pyhä ski area turned out to not be a human-sized hole. But while returning to the airport in Rovaniemi, we drove south of the city to look at Tapulikallion onkalot (Tapulicliff holes). We founded a very weird, large boulder.

Usually, Finnish boulders are moved around by the ice age, and are made of hard rock and sharp edges. But the Tapulikallio boulder is ... weathered? Dissolved? Lost the weak parts of the stone? The entire boulder is covered by 5-10 cm small holes and crevices. 

At first we thought there's no proper cave here at all, even if the Finnish book of caves lists a "0.5 meter cave" at this location. But there is actually a hole under the rock, big enough for one person to be fully inside. I don't think this hole is necessarily part of the same weathering process as there was on the outside of the boulder. The rock surfaces are smoother, so maybe the hole is simply space left under the boulder.

The opening of the hole was maybe one meter across, and 40-50 cm high, and perhaps 70 cm deep. But on the right side of the hole the cave continued a little bit, maybe 1.5 meters so that one could indeed go entirely in.

The boulder is by the road, at coordinates N 66.40315 E 25.42945, near the shores of Kemijoki river. The name of the road going by is "Kemijärven itäpuolentie". 

There's also a simple (not measured) map here.

Rock surface:


The boulder:


Inside:




A troll?


More rock forms:


This article has also appeared at TGR. See more caving stories at Planetcaver.net, and all Planetskier and Planetcaver stories at Blogspot and TGR! See also my cave map that runs the Psgeo software that has now been open sourced! This article and photos are (c) 2020 by Tero Kivinen and Jari Arkko. All rights reserved.

Sunday, November 15, 2020

Not broken

It isn't broken. It just needs more duct tape.


This article has also been published at TGR. See more Planetskier stories from TGRBlogspot, and Planetskier.net. Photos, videos, and text (c) 2020 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved

Dogs and caves in Löpärö

(Photo by Jarmo Ruuth)

Jouni had organized a tour of the Löpärö island in Sipoo for us, with the local guide Jukka showing us the cave locations.  I think all of us were expecting a nice walk but small caves. But we were really impressed by what we found! Just take a look at these photos by Jarmo Ruuth! (Also some by Jari or Elena.)

The Finnish book of caves lists caves in one cliff area on the west side of the island, but the Finnish registry of historic artefacts lists another one on the north side. We visited both.

The north side was a particularly impressive surprise. Massive boulders, with interesting caves underneath. There's one main cave with some side passages and levels inside, total length of passages nearing 30 meters. Under the same massive boulder there's also another separate cave room, with very tight entrances on both ends, one roughly 30cm high under the boulder and one in a tight crack on the other end. And another large boulder has a large, high room under it as well.

The caves near the cliff area were also impressive, kind of reminded us of the caves in Vihti's Rokokallio. Roof caves at the bottom of a cliff, but with cracks continuing deeper into the hill. We realized that the two most obvious caves next to each other are actually connected after Tor and Jouni crawled through. I followed them, and realized that I was in a place that I had already been from the other cave only after sitting a few minutes in there. On my first visit I had not realized that one could actually go through the very low bottom to reach the next cave. Together these two caves form a fairly big cave by Finnish standards.

The trip was also very nice in other ways. The first time I was caving with my caver friends since the summer. Incidentally, the planning for this trip started in our summer trip to Vihti, when Jouni first brought it up. Glad we were able to organise this now. Also, several new people, including reinforcements from France :-)

The boulder cave is at the coordinates N 60.244704 E 25.442641, its side room at N 60.244681 E 25.442596, and the other boulder cave at N 60.244814 E 25.442711. The main crack cave is on the other side of the island at coordinates N 60.24025 E 25.418035

I also drew maps of the caves, here are the boulder cave main hall map & side room map, and other boulder cave map. And here's the map of the main crack cave.

Crack cave:

(Photo by Jari Arkko)


(Photo by Jari Arkko)


(Photo by Jari Arkko)



(Photo by Jarmo Ruuth)



(Photo by Jarmo Ruuth)



(Photo by Jarmo Ruuth)


Boulder cave:

(Photo by Jarmo Ruuth)


(Photo by Elena Arre)


(Photo by Jari Arkko)


Side room:

(Photo by Jarmo Ruuth)


Other boulder cave:

(Photo by Jari Arkko)


Here we are hiking in a traditional Finnish forest:

(Photo by Jari Arkko)


And the mansion:

(Photo by Jarmo Ruuth)


Dogs:

(Photo by Jari Arkko)


This article has also been published at TGR. See more caving stories at Planetcaver.net, and all Planetskier and Planetcaver stories at Blogspot and TGR! See also my cave map that runs the Psgeo software that has now been open sourced! This article and photos are (c) 2020 by Jarmo Ruuth, Elena Arre, and Jari Arkko. All rights reserved.

Maintenance!

I've been putting this moment off for some reason. But now they are there: both of my main skis are in maintenance and repair holiday at the Ski Service. Lets see how shiny they come out!

See more Planetskier stories from TGRBlogspot, and Planetskier.net. Photos, videos, and text (c) 2020 by Jari Arkko. All rights reserved.